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jackanthfern:

hotcheetoprincess:

this was the ultimate bop in grade 6

The bop of 4/19/2014 the fuck this song is eternal

Driver, roll up the partition pleaseeee*Rolls up own partition*

Driver, roll up the partition pleaseeee
*Rolls up own partition*

pardonmewhileipanic:

gabifresh:

The gabifresh x swimsuitsforall bikini has been restocked and is now available to buy here! For more photos from this shoot, check out gabifresh.com! If you reblog, please keep this caption <3

in size fat pls

dreemboat:

COMING SOON 2 MY ETSY STORE… Stickers!! Get ready for some super cute Etsy treats comin’ yr way!

dreemboat:

COMING SOON 2 MY ETSY STORE… Stickers!! Get ready for some super cute Etsy treats comin’ yr way!

lovingsylvia:

pic and a great article on Sylvia Plath and her baking exploits via thedabbler.co.uk
**Sylvia Plath’s Tomato Soup Cake with Cream Cheese Frosting**
The Tomato Soup Cake seems to be the most popular one among Sylvia Plath’s favorite baking goods, another recipe from Sylvia’s bible The Joy of Cooking.
Scholars such as Kate Moses (see for recipe using raisins, walnuts), P.H. Davies (see for recipes using sultanas, prunes, almonds) or Graywolf Press (see for recipe using raisins, pecans or walnuts) have already dared to bake the Depression-era treat aka known as the Mystery Cake, apparently very popular in the 1930s, even though many seem to view the concept of putting tomato soup in a cake, using Erin Kottk’s words “simultaneously repulsive and appealing”.
In her awesome article Baking with Sylvia (hence the name for the theme week!) published on 15 February 2003 in The Guardian, Kate Moses, the author of Wintering: The Novel of Sylvia Plath, tells us that Sylvia Plath documented in her 1962 daily calendar that she made tomato soup cake on the day (14 November 1962) she composed Death &amp; Co. 
Kate Moses also tells us that "Plath loved it, and she made it over and over; she wrote to her mother to inquire about the size of tomato soup cans in America, because the first cake she made in England was "a bit wet"."
I think, this will be the first Sylvia Plath cake I’m going to make, even though I’m kinda scared and repulsed myself. HAHAH! ;)
For vegan Sylvia Plath inspired Tomato Cupcakes, see fablesfortables.com! :)
P.S.: It’s really funny how the Barbara Laage/Sylvia Plath craziness invaded the internet: in her tomato soup cake recipe Maria Denardo fromelizabethstreet.com uses the wrong picture and claims it to be Sylvia Plath! LOL! ;)

lovingsylvia:

pic and a great article on Sylvia Plath and her baking exploits via thedabbler.co.uk

**Sylvia Plath’s Tomato Soup Cake with Cream Cheese Frosting**

The Tomato Soup Cake seems to be the most popular one among Sylvia Plath’s favorite baking goods, another recipe from Sylvia’s bible The Joy of Cooking.

Scholars such as Kate Moses (see for recipe using raisins, walnuts), P.H. Davies (see for recipes using sultanas, prunes, almonds) or Graywolf Press (see for recipe using raisins, pecans or walnuts) have already dared to bake the Depression-era treat aka known as the Mystery Cake, apparently very popular in the 1930s, even though many seem to view the concept of putting tomato soup in a cake, using Erin Kottk’s words “simultaneously repulsive and appealing”.

In her awesome article Baking with Sylvia (hence the name for the theme week!) published on 15 February 2003 in The Guardian, Kate Moses, the author of Wintering: The Novel of Sylvia Plath, tells us that Sylvia Plath documented in her 1962 daily calendar that she made tomato soup cake on the day (14 November 1962) she composed Death & Co.

Kate Moses also tells us that "Plath loved it, and she made it over and over; she wrote to her mother to inquire about the size of tomato soup cans in America, because the first cake she made in England was "a bit wet"."

I think, this will be the first Sylvia Plath cake I’m going to make, even though I’m kinda scared and repulsed myself. HAHAH! ;)

For vegan Sylvia Plath inspired Tomato Cupcakes, see fablesfortables.com! :)

P.S.: It’s really funny how the Barbara Laage/Sylvia Plath craziness invaded the internet: in her tomato soup cake recipe Maria Denardo fromelizabethstreet.com uses the wrong picture and claims it to be Sylvia Plath! LOL! ;)

"Stonewall was colored folks, poor folks, transsexuals, femmes, butches… a little bit of everybody. But the narrative that gets sold to people is that it was all these ‘A-Gay’ white normative people. That’s not who riots. Sorry."
— Juba Kalamka in this interview  (via femmeanddangerous)